FP7 KBBE Programme Funds 3 Large-Scale Biotech Projects from DTU

FP7 KBBE Programme Funds 3 Large-Scale Biotech Projects from DTU

19-08-13

Innovayt and Novo Nordisk Foundation Center for Biosustainability at DTU joined forces and worked together in the preparation of three successful proposals to the European Knowledge Based Bio-Economy (KBBE) Programme.

The PROMYS project will develop, validate and implement a novel synthetic biology platform technology termed ligand responsive regulation and selection systems. Ligand responsive regulation and selection systems are biological devices that integrate biological sensing modules, within larger regulatory networks to control cellular programs. The consortium is composed by 7 partners - 3 industrial partners and 2 SMEs. The duration of the project will be 4 years and will receive a total funding of around EUR 6.7 million.

The BacHBerry project aims to develop a portfolio of sustainable methodologies to mine the potential of the untapped biodiversity of the bioactive phenolic compounds in an extensive collection of berry species. The consortium is composed by 18 partners - 5 industrial partners and 4 SMEs. The duration of the project will be 3 years and will receive a total funding of around EUR 7.3 million.

The BioREFINE-2G wants to develop commercially attractive processes for efficient conversion of pentose-rich side-streams from biorefineries into dicarboxylic acids, which can be used as precursors for bio-based polymers including biodegradable polymers. The consortium is composed by 8 partners - 5 industrial partners and 3 SMEs. The duration of the project will be 4 years and will receive a total funding of around EUR 4.8 million.

The EU funding for the three projects will be about EUR 18.9 million and will allow Novo Nordisk Foundation Center for Biosustainability at DTU to take an important step towards the goal of developing new technologies to help facilitate the transformation from the existing oil-based chemical industry to a more sustainable bio-based society, in which chemicals are produced biologically.

For more information contact Thomas Knudsen.